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How She Did It: Making the Most of College Blog College 

How She Did It: Making the Most of College

Madeline Hudson is majoring in law and public policy at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington, but her college experiences have taken her beyond the classroom. She has traveled through study abroad opportunities to Cuba and India, and is philanthropy chair of Alpha Delta Alpha, an international pre-law fraternity. She’s also a member of IU Model United Nations and has traveled as a delegate, as well as chaired the IUMUN Commission on the Status of Women at its conference for high schoolers. She chose those…

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Brownsburg Senior Wins 2019 Scholarship. Could You Be Next? Blog College Featured 

Brownsburg Senior Wins 2019 Scholarship. Could You Be Next?

Bryce Dixon, who graduated with the Brownsburg High School class of 2019, entered the Next Indiana scholarship contest in 2018 and won $1,500 for college. Dixon will attend Indiana University. He plans to study finance and accounting, with a complementary minor in Spanish. “I also might consider international business, as my minor in Spanish will permit me to work abroad in countries that speak the Spanish language,” Dixon said. To prepare for college, Dixon said he took many AP classes in high school to become accustomed to the workload of…

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Tips to Finding the Right College College 

Tips to Finding the Right College

Going to college is the next logical step after high school, but make sure your choice fits you, your career plan, and your budget. Three ways to start: Think ahead. Your career goals should shape your college choice. Some certificate programs can get you into a job in less than a year. On the other hand, you might want to be a lawyer, doctor, scientist or physical therapist, which will require many more years of education, and you’ll want to factor those plans into your decision. Create your path for…

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Major Moves College 

Major Moves

Jobs are organized into broad categories, called career clusters. Within 16 different career clusters, you’ll find almost unlimited opportunities. You can learn more about all of them, including employment and wages, education and training, and projected job openings, at the Bureau of of Labor Statistics’ Career Outlook pages at bls.gov/careeroutlook. Check out a sample of the career clusters below, and a short list of college majors that might help you advance: Architecture & Construction Careers involve designing and building homes, roads and other structures. Possible college majors: building/construction management, architecture, interior…

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College, Your Way College 

College, Your Way

Indiana has more than 100 choices of colleges and universities, ranging from two Big 10 schools—Indiana University and Purdue University—to more than a dozen independent institutions, and several choices that fall in between in terms of size. You can go big, go small, or stay close to home. It can cost a little—or a lot. What’s your style? Check out these options: Community college: At Ivy Tech Community College campuses throughout the state or Vincennes University in Vincennes and Indianapolis, you can earn a certificate or two-year associate degree quicker…

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Meet Matthew Calisto – High School Hard Work Pays Off College 

Meet Matthew Calisto – High School Hard Work Pays Off

Matthew Calisto and his older brother were called “the brains” by his parents, but hard work played a big part in his success in high school and getting into college. Calisto plans to study mechanical engineering at Purdue University, where his good grades in high school won him a Presidential Scholarship for $2,400. He also received a scholarship from the Cass County Community Foundation, and applied for a handful of others from local organizations. “My parents saved, but I feel guilty accepting my parents’ money,” Calisto says. “I was never…

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College Admissions Do’s and Don’ts College Featured 

College Admissions Do’s and Don’ts

Do create a list. After doing some research, create a list of six colleges you will apply to, based on whether they’re a good “fit” for your goals and your family’s finances. Thinking about your test scores and personal profile, include a few “safety” schools and one “reach” school. Don’t miss a deadline. Review the requirements and deadlines for each college on your list, as well as scholarship and FAFSA deadlines, then put them on your calendar or smartphone. You can find Indiana college application deadlines at LearnMoreIndiana.org/college. Do apply…

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Step Up to the Degree You Need College Featured 

Step Up to the Degree You Need

Climbing the ladder of success isn’t easy, but education can help. Each level of education you earn can bring a higher income, better career options, and more job satisfaction. Taking it step-by-step is a cost-effective way to pursue higher education. Some colleges encourage “stackable degrees” that enable you to earn a certificate, then have those credits count toward the next levels of study: associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate. Doctorate Many careers in the fields of medicine and science require doctorate (Ph.D.) degrees, as well as other fields that include research…

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Search and Find Your Campus Resources College Featured 

Search and Find Your Campus Resources

One of the best skills you can learn in college is how to be your own advocate and ask for help when you need it. Many resources exist on college campuses to help students. For example, you can visit the learning center on campus for tutoring and academic help, or consult your resident advisor for roommate troubles. Take your money concerns to the financial aid office, and don’t wait to get to the health center for physical and mental health problems. For fun, definitely check out the student center or…

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Meet Lisa Fischer  – Search Proves Successful for College, Career College 

Meet Lisa Fischer – Search Proves Successful for College, Career

Growing up, Lisa Fischer helped her parents on their pumpkin farm, but hoped to study engineering in college after graduating from La Porte High School in La Porte, Indiana. Plans change: After a high school summer engineering camp, Fischer decided that career wasn’t her thing at all. “It was helpful, if anything, to not waste time in college on something I didn’t want to do.” Next step: Her high school chemistry teacher suggested that pharmacy might be a good fit. Fischer checked with the Indiana Department of Workforce Development’s “Hot…

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First Year Stumbling Blocks College 

First Year Stumbling Blocks

Andy Carr, Intern for IBJ In high school, every day is a set schedule; school is a routine block of time in the middle of the day, and it’s pretty much continuous from beginning to end. Wake up, go to school, participate in whatever extracurricular activity you may be a part of, and go home in the evening to do your homework. Your time is pretty regimented, and it’s easier to know when you will and won’t have time to get things done. In college, you may not start class…

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Stack ‘em Up College 

Stack ‘em Up

College means more than you might think. It’s any educational experience after high school that offers a quality credential or degree. That includes technical, one-year, two-year, four-year opportunities and military educational experiences. And a four-year degree brings the opportunity to move ahead to a master’s or professional degree and doctorate. Which will enable you to reach your career goal? Learn more about pursuing financial aid for college study on page 36-41. Stackable degrees are a cost-effective way to pursue higher education. Some colleges offer this option, which enables you to…

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What Do I Need to Bring to College? College 

What Do I Need to Bring to College?

We asked the experts—and their answers may surprise you (hint: they have nothing to do with furnishing your dorm room).   “Adaptability. I think adaptability is important because college is full of so many new people and experiences. The easier you can adapt, the quicker you can get used to all the changes in college.” – Allie Megl, Purdue University   “To me, time management is the most important personality trait for incoming freshmen because you are required to take on a lot more work as well as responsibility. Without…

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Students Speak: Tre Robinson College 

Students Speak: Tre Robinson

Tre Robinson Development Automation Engineer, Salesforce/Ivy Tech ASAP Program Grad Age: 23 Hometown: Indianapolis High School: Arsenal Technical High School   College choice: Tre earned his associate degree in computer and networking technology in the Ivy Tech ASAP program, which offers the opportunity to earn an associate degree in just 11 months. The ASAP program was the best choice for him “due to life and family situations. I had a part-time job and was looking to get working right out of school to help out. One of my guidance counselors…

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Five Steps to College Admission Success College 

Five Steps to College Admission Success

1. Plan Piece by piece, step by step. Write down your goals and then research colleges. Create a list of six colleges you will apply to, based on whether they’re a good “fit” for your goals and your family’s finances. Thinking about your test scores and personal profile, include a few “safety” schools and one “reach” school. 2. Pay attention to deadlines. The best-laid plans won’t come to pass if you don’t meet college application and scholarship deadlines. Review the deadlines for each college on your list, as well as…

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Testing Tips College 

Testing Tips

Register online for the ACT and SAT. You can set up an account at act.org for the ACT, and at collegereadiness.collegeboard.org for the SAT. Before you register, check with your counselor. You may qualify for fee waivers for both tests that are available for low-income juniors and seniors. Check with your school counselor for more details and help with arranging a fee waiver.   2017-2018 ACT Test Date                    Registration Deadline June 10, 2017              May 5, 2017 September 9, 2017     August 4, 2017 October 28, 2017        September 22, 2017 December 9,…

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Clean it up! College 

Clean it up!

Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are important tools that can help you get into college or find a job—but if you’re not careful, they can really hurt you. Admissions offices and companies often review applicants’ social media sites before deciding whether to accept or hire someone. “We recommend students do a full assessment of their ‘digital dirt,’” says Gary Beaulieu, director of Internship and Career Services at Butler University. “Take time to look over your profile, check pics, Google yourself to see if anything that could be considered inappropriate can be…

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As Purdue prepares to open a high school this fall, leaders are already talking about a network Blog College Education 

As Purdue prepares to open a high school this fall, leaders are already talking about a network

Originally posted on Chalkbeat by Dylan Peers McCoy on March 31, 2017 Purdue University won’t open the doors to its first high school for another five months, but its leaders are already planning for more. Purdue Polytechnic High School will open this fall in Indianapolis with 150 freshmen taking part in a bold experiment: using a new project-based curriculum focused on science and math skills to better serve low-income students and students of color. As part of the Indianapolis Public Schools innovation network, the high school will also have an…

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New rules push high schools to better prepare kids for college College Education Plan Prepare 

New rules push high schools to better prepare kids for college

Originally posted on Chalkbeat by Shaina Cavazos on December 16, 2014 A stubborn and costly problem for first-year students at Indiana colleges stems from a simple but frustrating fact: About 28 percent of them simply aren’t fully prepared to do college work, even if they got good grades in high school. To solve that problem, those kids are shuttled into remedial courses that they pay for but which don’t result in college credit when students pass them. Many of those students fall behind and the risk grows that they will…

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Fast-growing ‘early college’ schools push kids through barriers to college Blog College Education Prepare 

Fast-growing ‘early college’ schools push kids through barriers to college

Originally posted on Chalkbeat by Dylan Peers McCoy on March 28, 2016 Education leaders in Indiana and across the country are promoting early college high schools that let students earn a diploma and an associate’s degree at the same time. The programs give students a leg up on college — and save them thousands of dollars in tuition. But as they proliferate, early colleges are growing from a niche alternative in a handful of tiny schools to a new strategy for preparing high school students for the future. Indiana is…

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